Kurta

113 products

113 products


 

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Kurta is upper wear with front and back of long rectangular shape stitched together. It can be upper knee-length or below the knee length. It is stitched from sides till waist length and then opens till bottom, to provide the ease while walking. Both men and women wear it. It is a two or three-piece set for both men and women. Men wear kurta with pyjama, salwar or dhoti and sometimes a basket or a royal look cloth hanging on a shoulder and then lying on the arm in front. Women wear the kurtas with legging or pyjama, sometimes with dupatta and sometimes without a dupatta.
In ancient era kurta was collarless, but with evolving times a straight and stiff collar from back of the neck, inch on the front, on both sides are in trend. Ladies and gents kurta differ in shape, type of cloth, and print of fabric. Gents kurta is usually loose, and ladies kurta is fit for slim ladies, not too slim ladies prefer it to be free.
Men wear kurta as casual wear or as ethnic wear for traditional events. Basket and royal cloth hanging on the shoulder is with ethnic look kurta not with casual wear. Everyday wear kurtas are worn with pyjama or dhoti, and another type is worn with all three options. Women mostly wear it as casual wear or party wear and sometimes for ethnic events.
The everyday wear kurta is made of simple Cotton or synthetic cloth which can be plain, printed, or with little bit embroidery and no embroidery in the case of men. The exclusive occasion kurtas are made of special cloth like
embroidered cloth/sequinned fabric, glitter fabric, lame, silk satin/silk charmeuse, brocade, peau de soi silk, and there are many more.
The history of kurtas is a little bit complex. According to author Roshen Alkazi, stitched, i.e. cut and sewn attire came to South Asia from Central Asia. There was just a spark during the Scythian/Parthian/Kushan invasions of the late ancient period, which markedly increased after the incursions of Mahmud of Ghazni, the floodgates opening with the Muslim conquests of the late 12th century until the kurta became an item of everyday attire during the Mughal period.
Kurtas are not too costly, available at all ranges, affordable for every person out there, and easy to buy.